New year, new start

how to make New Year’s resolutions that stick

How many of last year’s New Year’s resolutions did you keep? If you can’t even remember them all a year later, let alone whether you stuck to them, you’re not alone. One survey found that 58% of Aussies break their resolutions within the year. And 15% of those do so because they forgot what they promised they’d do in the first place.i

That doesn’t mean that you can’t set and achieve things you actually want. You just have to be smart about the way you do it.

Turn visions in to goals

When someone asks you to picture your ideal lifestyle, what you see in your head is actually a collection of dozens of different goals. It’s important to break it down and articulate those goals if you want your vision to become a reality.

This is easier than it sounds. Just say you want to ‘enjoy life more’. To make a start on this, you could write down a list of social activities and hobbies you love doing or would really like to try. Then turn each one in to a task that fits with your schedule and can be planned ahead of time, like ‘Make a date with a friend twice a week’ or ‘Book in for an evening class every month’. If your schedule is jam packed, set corresponding time management goals like ‘Leave work on time at least 3 out of 5 days’.

Tell people

Think of your friends and family as your cheerleaders and supporters in reaching your goals. If you tell them what you’re aiming for and why, they’ll be better able to help you. They might even be able to join you on your way. For example, if you decide you want to lose weight and get fitter, ask around for a gym buddy or someone to join you on walks. Or if you’re ready to make a change in your career, start putting the word out amongst your network, that you’re open to new opportunities.

Give yourself (the right amount of) time

Yearly goals, especially ongoing ones, can be hard to keep track of. Try to work out a reasonable time frame for your goal. Some small things might be quicker, and feel less significant – but you can always build on your results. And some things just take time. For example, you’re unlikely to save up for a new car or lose 20 kilos in a month. But you might lose two kilos, or save X-percent of the amount you need. Consultant Todd Herman reckons the ideal time frame for the brain to plan around is 90 days, and that it’s better to do a series of goals ‘sprints’ rather than one long marathon.

Keep track of your progress

If you’re the kind of person who uses to-do lists – on paper, in an app, or in project management software – you’ll know how satisfying it is to tick something off. If you’re not in the habit of keeping lists, now is the time to start. Your list shouldn’t just be one point – your resolution with a check box next to it. Break it down in to smaller milestones. Say you’ve resolved to improve your diet – set yourself little achievements like ‘went a whole week without eating favourite junk food’. To make it fun, try a smart phone game like Habitica.ii

Don’t wait ‘til December 31st

It might be a New Year tradition, but you don’t have to wait for one particular time of year to set goals and resolve to change your life. With the right attitude and a bit of planning, you can start working your way towards a goal any time.

Speaking of this, we’re here to help you set and achieve your money-related goals. Don’t wait for an annual appointment to chat; drop us a line any time, we’d love to hear from you!

i. finder.com.au, Be a geek and live in Tasmania: How to win at New Year’s resolutions

ii. Habitica

General Advice Warning This information is of a general nature only and neither represents nor is intended to be specific advice on any particular matter. Michael J Berinson Pty Ltd strongly suggests that no person should act specifically on the basis of the information contained herein but should seek appropriate professional advice based upon their own personal circumstances. Although we consider the sources for this material reliable, no warranty is given and no liability is accepted for any statement or opinion or for any error or omission.

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