Archive for the ‘Exclusive Environs’ Category

Are you over 30? You need to read this…

Monday, August 21st, 2017

Superannuation is, and will continue to be, a hot topic in the financial advice industry. No matter what your age, once you begin your working life superannuation should be in the back of your mind, but MoneyTalk magazine have uncovered some confronting statistics that it’s worth thinking about if you’re around the age of 30.

If you’re 30 years old today, you have 35 years left in the workforce and need to save enough superannuation to fund you for 35 years of retirement. Now, many of you may be thinking – ‘Hold on a minute, I don’t need to save for that many years!’ well, with the ever increasing medical improvements you just might. The median age of death is increasing by 0.6 years every year, and currently sits at age 84. If this rate continues, by the time today’s 65 year old’s reach their mid 80’s, life expectancy could have been bumped up to around 94 years old!

If you’re in your 30’s or 40’s today, it’s not unlikely that you could need to fund your retirement until the age of 100 – an intimidating prospect for many. If you’re going to live to 100, and only work until you’re 65 it is estimated that you’ll need a nest egg of $3,000,000 – but how are you going to achieve this?

1. Review your superannuation fund now

When reviewing your superannuation fund, take a detailed look at the investment returns and any fees to be paid. Take special notice of tax being deducted from your account before payment needs to be made, this can equate to thousands of dollars’ worth of lost investment returns over the years.

2. Consider making extra contributions

The younger you start contributing extra funds to your superannuation account, the better off you will be. However, there are strict limitations of how much money you can contribute to your fund, and in what capacity you can contribute- familiarise yourself with these rules so as to avoid any mistakes.

3. Build up non-superannuation investments

Think about bettering your financial situation as a whole, rather than focusing solely on your superannuation. Think of how best to build your investments outside of your superannuation, with a view to eventually transferring them into your super in the most tax efficient way. You Financial Adviser can help you to plan this out.

4. Consider gearing

Borrowing to invest money is not suitable for everyone, be sure to speak to you Financial Adviser if you are considering this as an option to boost your superannuation. If done correctly, gearing can be used both inside and outside superannuation.

No matter what your current age, you must consider and plan for your financial future – invest your time as well as your money into superannuation planning.

Source: Money Matters Magazine, December 2016.

An article by Infocus Securities

Economic Update August 2017

Monday, August 21st, 2017

Within this month’s update, we share with you a snapshot of economic occurrences both nationally and from around the globe.

Economic growth improves in key countries
– China economy shows strong signs of strengthening
– Australian employment data continues strength
– Rates on hold in Australia and the United States (US)

We hope you find this month’s Economic Update as informative as always. If you have any feedback or would like to discuss any aspect of this report, please contact Michael Berinson or his office.

There were some notable economic growth numbers released in July. After a few years of declining (but still stellar) growth numbers in China, the latest statistic was back up to 6.9%. The new China leadership team is about to be ushered in and the Chinese know how to throw a party. On top of that, the China Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) came in at 51.4 for manufacturing and 54.5 for services – both in the sweet spot. Throw in 11.0% for Retail Sales and 7.6% for Industrial Output and you have what Keating might call, ‘a beautiful set of numbers’.

Turning to the US, the anaemic growth in Q1 was overshadowed by the June quarter coming in at 2.6%. True it’s not the 3% that the Fed is aiming for or the 4% that Trump was dreaming of. But 2.6% is really solid. Unemployment is low at 4.4% and 222,000 jobs were created in June when only 180,000 new jobs were expected. It is true that wage growth was low at just 0.2% but you can’t have everything all at once can you?

Even Australia was looking good. We had some very nice jobs and unemployment data – against the trend of 2016. For whatever reason, the labour force data are looking better. But the RBA chimed in at the start of July saying that 3.5% is our ‘neutral’ interest rate. That is, rates should be at 3.5% when things are chugging along. Since we are sitting on only 1.5%, there are a lot of hikes in the pipeline!

It was a bit silly to advertise that opinion just now and an Assistant Governor had to come out and hose things down. Retail sales did come in at a biggish 0.6% for the month. We’re not cooking on gas but at least we are cooking again.

As we go around the world the United Kingdom (UK) is starting to struggle a little with its latest growth of only 0.3% for the quarter and Brexit looming large. Prime Minister Abe in Japan has gone from rock star status to a meagre approval rating of 29.9% in a few years. The Royal Bank of Canada bumped up rates to 0.75% from 0.5%.

So the dice are still rolling. Fortunes are rising and falling but there seems to be no basket cases anymore and there is lots of good news.

We became aware of a new expression this week. It’s been out but under the radar for a few years. It’s still worth sharing. On asking why stock markets – particularly in the US – remain strong – the new catch phrase is that it is a TINA market. Not as in Turner or Arena, but it is the acronym for ‘There Is No Alternative’. Money has to be invested somewhere when cash rates are so low.

TINA puts a safety net under markets for a while but we must be vigilant for when Tina starts singing.

So where to from her? Trump is floundering but his economy is doing well. The Australian economy seems to have stabilised. To us, it looks like a smooth ride ahead – until we see otherwise.

The current US reporting season has been unusually strong meaning that increases in earnings are supporting recent stock price strength. Can it go on? In a word, yes!

The big Tech Companies are having mixed results but they are looking strong. We should never be complacent but the second half of 2017 doesn’t look too bad at all. Perhaps we all deserve a break after the trials and tribulations of 2008 – 2015.

Asset Classes

Australian Equities

The ASX 200 was flat for the month of July. The Materials sector was the strongest on the back of some very strong commodity price movements. Healthcare took a beating at 7.5% with Utilities ( 5.3%), Telcos ( 4.3%) and Industrials ( 3.2%) not far behind. Financials (+1.2%) put in a creditable performance. A big sector rotation just took place.

Our August reporting season is just getting underway. As always, the companies’ outlook statements will be crucial for the future of our market. We have found some recent softening in broker forecasts of company earnings and dividends. At least that downgrade has resulted in our forecasts for capital gains to be only a tad under the long-run average.

Foreign Equities

The S&P 500 fared a bit better than us in July posting a solid +1.9% capital gain. The London FTSE also did well at +0.8%. Emerging Markets were particularly strong at +4.1% on the rising tide of commodity prices.

Our expectations for Wall Street are for a good finish for the year despite the strong first seven months of +10.3%.

Bonds and Interest Rates

With the “Fed” (US Federal Reserve) on hold again in July, the next chance for a hike is at the September meeting. But most forecasters are not expecting another hike this year. The odds of a rate hike by December are priced in at a little under 50%.

The Fed is widely expected to start its balance sheet repair in September. This amounts to gradually lowering the $4.5 trillion bond debt down to $2.5 trillion over a number of years. Since this policy will gradually raise long rates on its own, there is no reason for the Fed to also raise the underlying Federal Funds rate at the short end.

The RBA kept rates on hold again in July and August. The majority of pundits are expecting the next move to be up but not until at least the middle of 2018 – and possibly 2019.

Our view of needing a cut at home is on the back burner for the moment. We need a little more data to change our call. It all depends upon the next GDP growth number to be posted on September 6.

Other Assets

Commodity prices were on a flier in July. Iron ore was up +15.2%, Brent Oil up +9.8% and Copper up +6.2%. Our dollar was up +3.8% against the greenback.

The volatility index called the VIX was down 3.7% in July. This fear index is around all-time lows.

Since we are a commodity producing and exporting country, the restoration of solid commodity prices bodes well for our total exports and GDP growth.

However, not everyone wins from this sectoral rotation. Healthcare and a number of Industrials names are finding stronger headwinds after a good first half to 2017.

For example, our Healthcare sector is up +13.0% for the year-to-date including the poor 7.5% for July.

Regional Analysis

Australia

Our headline CPI inflation came in at only +0.2% for the quarter or +1.9% for the year. Since the RBA’s target range is 2% to 3%, this read gives the RBA no motive to raise rates anytime soon.

With total employment up around 170,000 in the first half of 2017 – with nearly all of them full-time jobs – we are back on track. During that period, the unemployment rate has been stuck at around 5.6% and wage growth is non-existent.

Europe

The focus in Europe is on what the implications of Brexit are for employment and trade. It will be nearly two years before we find out the full story so we cannot expect much good news from that region in the medium term.

However, the underlying economies are so much stronger than in recent times. We don’t have to waste much energy worrying about Greece and the other ‘PIGS’ countries anymore. Can you remember what PIGS stands for? Those days are gone!

China

The China data have been on a roll for quite a while. Without taking sides, it is hard to conclude after recent data that China is not undoubtedly doing well at the moment. Yes, there are political problems with the US and who would want North Korea as a neighbour – let alone an ally.

But what seems to be forming is a view that China has regained its role as a lead player in the world – as solid and dependable – at least in an economic sense.

US

Trump is hiring and firing quicker than he did on “The Apprentice” – but the West Wing is for real.

The US is facing a number of problems in a month or so but these ‘episodes’ on TV have not stopped US jobs and growth.

We don’t think anyone can reliably predict how this scenario will play out but, as annoying as the tweets and press releases are, the economy is marching on!

Rest of the World

With sanctions on Russia being on the front burner, and the woes of the Venezuelan leadership also up there on many news wires, some instability in oil pricing is likely. Both countries are big exporters.

Article prepared by Infocus Securities

Give yourself more flexibility in the lead up to retirement

Thursday, November 10th, 2016

take-control-your-retirement

Nowadays, we’re living for years longer than ever before. 60 is no longer old age! So it makes sense that you want the flexibility to approach retirement in a way that suits you. A transition to retirement strategy enables you to access part of your super while you are still working and has a number of benefits.

Boost your super and supplement your income

There are two main benefits of a transition to retirement strategy:

Maximising your super – You can continue to work while drawing an income from an account-based pension. By doing this you can salary sacrifice as much of your pre-tax salary to super as possible while receiving an income from your pension. This allows you to increase your retirement savings without reducing your income. This can also be extremely tax-effective because pension payments are generally taxed at a lower rate than your salary.

Supplementing your income – If you want to move into part-time work before you retire but don’t want your income to drop you can use your pension to supplement your salary.

Ease yourself into retirement

You can choose different transition to retirement strategies depending on what is most important to you. If you believe you have enough retirement savings you could still benefit from a transition to retirement strategy. For example, if you wanted to renovate your home before retirement you could keep working full-time and use the extra income from your transition to retirement pension to pay for the work. That way you get your home improvements done before retirement without taking on any debt.

Are you eligible?

You can take advantage of a transition to retirement strategy if you meet the following conditions:

You are aged between 56 and 65 years of age
You are still working
You transfer some, or all, of your super account to a transition to retirement pension

Important considerations for high income earners

It you earn a high income it’s important to consider the concessional contributions cap before deciding to salary sacrifice as part of a transition to retirement strategy. If you exceed the concessional contributions cap, which is currently $35,000 for the 2015-2016 financial year, you may be taxed an extra 31.5% tax on any contributions above the cap.

Set it up right from the start

Transition to retirement strategies can provide significant tax savings and benefits, but they can be complicated. For this reason we strongly recommend that you talk to us in the lead up to retirement, so that the strategy you put in place is right for your personal situation. Come in and have a free, no obligation initial chat, and then take it from there. 

Earning A High Income Won’t Automatically Make You Wealthy

Monday, September 5th, 2016

business-growth-success-financial-graph-1912306

When you earn enough money to pay for everything you need there’s no reason to save regularly, right? Wrong. There’s far more to becoming wealthy than earning a high income as suggested in the well-known proverb ‘The art is not in making money, but in keeping it’.

High income earners can make the worst savers

It’s an unfortunate fact of life nowadays that the more you earn, the more you tend to spend. Today, there is so much pressure to spend money on the latest gadgets, prestigious fashion labels and having a picture postcard home. We’re living in a spending culture where the next best thing is always just around the corner.

When you earn a higher than average income it’s easy to justify upgrading your lifestyle here and treating yourself a little bit there. After all, you’ve worked hard to earn that income and you want to get some enjoyment out of it.

And even if you don’t think of yourself as the type of person who is careless with their money, there may be other factors at work. Behavioural scientists have shown that it’s human nature to seek instant gratification. We’re much more likely to do something that makes us feel good now, like spoiling our loved ones with lavish gifts, than doing something that’s better for us in the long term, like saving some of our money.

You reap what you sow

You may be able afford a high standard of living now but could this lifestyle be maintained if you stopped working?
To get the full benefit of your income you need to cap your spending and get into the habit of putting away part of what you earn every week or month. This way your money can start working for you.

There are many benefits of having spare cash around:

You will have money set aside for any small emergencies so you don’t have to worry about how you will cope if something goes wrong

You will be able buy things with cash rather than credit cards. Many retailers offer discounts for paying with cash. And you’ll be saving money because you won’t be paying interest on credit card purchases.

Importantly you will have spare money for investing which will help you grow and protect your wealth over the long term.

The more you save, the more you will earn

Regular investing also gives you the chance to boost your savings by taking advantage of compound interest. Compounding, or earning interest on your interest can make a significant difference to the value of your savings or investments over time. The longer you save, the greater the effect of compounding.

Let’s look at a simple example that shows the power of compound interest. Say you had savings of $20,000 and each month you put away $500. In just 10 years that $20,000 would have grown to $110,074, assuming the interest rate on your bank account was 5%. Of that, $30,074 would be the compound interest that you’ve earned along the way.

Spend wisely and enjoy the benefits of saving

Starting a savings plan is one of the simplest and easiest ways to save money. Your savings are kept in a separate account to your everyday spending account, so you won’t be able to spend this money as part of your weekly expenses. It will also attract a higher rate of interest, which if left to accrue in the account, will help you get your goal of wealth creation underway.

Article prepared by Infocus Wealth Management